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Numbers behind the growth of tourism in Pakistan

The tourism in Pakistan has seen a steep growth since the last few years. The following figures highlight its effect to the economy and prove the above mentioned claim:
Direct Contribution to GDP:
The direct contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP was PKR930.9bn (USD8,832.1mn), 2.9% of total the total contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP was PKR2,349.0bn (USD22,286.3mn), 7.4% of GDP in 2017, and is forecast to rise by 5.8% in 2018, and to rise by 5.4% pa to PKR4,200.4bn (USD39,851.6mn), 7.4% of GDP in 2028.
Total Contribution to GDP:
The total contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP was PKR2,349.0bn (USD22,286.3mn), 7.4% of GDP in 2017, and is forecast to rise by 5.8% in 2018, and to rise by 5.4% pa to PKR4,200.4bn (USD39,851.6mn), 7.4% of GDP in 2028.
Direct Contribution to Employment:
In 2017 Travel & Tourism directly supported 1,493,000 jobs (2.5% of total employment). This is expected to rise by 2.8% in 2018 and rise by 2.7% pa to 2,008,000 jobs (2.6% of total employment) in 2028. Visitor exports generated PKR98.7bn (USD936.4mn), 3.7% of total exports in 2017.
Total Contribution to Employment:
In 2017, the total contribution of Travel & Tourism to employment, including jobs indirectly supported by the industry was 6.5% of total employment (3,894,000 jobs). This is expected to rise by 2.6% in 2018 to 3,997,000 jobs and rise by 2.3% pa to 5,017,000 jobs in 2028 (6.5% of total).
Visitor Exports:
Visitor exports generated PKR98.7bn (USD936.4mn), 3.7% of total exports in 2017. This is forecast to grow by 4.7% in 2018, and grow by 6.4% pa, from 2018-2028, to PKR192.5bn (USD1,826.4mn) in 2028, 2.5% of total.
Investment:
Travel & Tourism investment in 2017 was PKR410.4bn, 9.1% of total investment (USD3,893.4mn). It should rise by 5.2% in 2018, and rise by 4.1% pa over the next ten years to PKR647.4bn (USD6,142.0mn) in 2028, 7.6% of total.


Travel & Tourism is an important economic activity in most countries around the world. As well as its direct economic impact, the industry has significant indirect and induced impacts. The UN Statistics Division-approved Tourism Satellite Accounting methodology (TSA: RMF 2008) quantifies only the direct contribution of Travel & Tourism. But WTTC recognizes that Travel & Tourism's total contribution is much greater, and aims to capture its indirect and induced impacts through its annual research.
The direct contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP reflects the ‘internal’ spending on Travel & Tourism (total spending within a particular spending by government on Travel & Tourism services directly linked to visitors, such as cultural (e.g museums) or recreational (e.g national parks).
The direct contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP is calculated to be consistent with the output, as expressed in National Accounting, tourists. The direct contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP is calculated from total internal spending by ‘netting out’ the purchases made by the different tourism sectors. This measure is consistent with the definition of Tourism GDP, specified in the 2008 Tourism Satellite.
The total contribution of Travel & Tourism includes its ‘wider impacts’ (ie the indirect and induced impacts) on the economy. The ‘indirect’ contribution includes the GDP and jobs supported by: Travel & Tourism investment spending – an important aspect of both current and future activity that includes investment activity such as the purchase of new aircraft and construction of new hotels;
Government 'collective' spending, which helps Travel & Tourism activity in many different ways as it is made on behalf of the Domestic purchases of goods and services by the sectors dealing directly with tourists – including, for example, purchases of food and cleaning services by hotels, of fuel and catering services by airlines, and IT services by travel agents.
The ‘induced’ contribution measures the GDP and jobs supported by the spending of those who are directly or indirectly employed by the Travel & Tourism industry.
Country on Travel & Tourism by residents and non-residents for business and leisure purposes) as well as government 'individual' spending - of tourism-characteristic sectors such as hotels, airlines, airports, travel agents and leisure and recreation services that deal directly with Account: Recommended Methodological Framework (TSA: RMF 2008). ‘community at large’ – eg tourism marketing and promotion, aviation, administration, security services, resort area security services, resort area sanitation services, etc;

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